Category: Busy Athletes

Busy Ironman Athletes: Think “Minimum Effective Dose,” Not “Overload”

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This post highlights a way I approach coaching busy triathletes, including Ironman racers.  This “minimum effective dose” approach was the foundation of my 10 hours per week Ironman training experiment.   However, it’s a good way for ANY triathlete to think about their training.

Most triathletes, especially Ironman racers, (as well as some coaches) think of training primarily in terms of overload and adaptation.  In other words, they pile on as much training as they think they can handle or whatever they think it takes to achieve their goals.  They feel the more they can pile on without injury, the more their body will adapt and get stronger. read more

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Coach Coady 10 hours per week Ironman training experiment:…

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This is the third post in my series on my experiment in trying to qualify for Kona on 10ish hours per week Ironman training plan.   It’s an example of how a busy athlete might approach Ironman training on a time budget.  I wanted to use this build as a learning experience to improve myself as a coach.  Before reading this post check out the previous posts: (1) The 10 Hours per Week Plan and (2) the halfway update of my 10 hours per week training.  This article picks up where they left off. read more

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tempo brick run for Ironman training

The Tempo Brick Run– the Busy Triathlete’s Best Friend!

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This article is part of our recent series on training for busy athletes.   It describes one of my favorite workouts I’m using to try to qualify for Kona Ironman World Championships on a plan of mostly 10ish hours power week.

Are you tired and falling behind struggling to fit in all your workouts on a busy schedule?  One of the biggest challenges we face in coaching busy triathletes (especially coaching Ironman triathletes) is figuring out how to set up a training plan that will get the athlete ready for their race (often Ironman) but that leaves then time to succeed at work and to enjoy their family (while also letting them sleep and maintain a strong foundation for adaptation). read more

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